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But, one year after the death of Osama bin Laden, the long war on terrorism is far from over. must also be ready to adapt its security strategies—such as to counter terror attacks by an increasing number of homegrown terrorists.Reviewing the terrorist plots that have been foiled since 9/11 can provide valuable information for understanding the nature of the threat, as well as best practices for preventing the next attack. After the death of Osama bin Laden on May 2, 2011, many worried that al-Qaeda would try to carry out another large-scale attack against the United States as an act of revenge.

Of course, it is also these same abilities that can make it more challenging for U. intelligence and law enforcement to detect homegrown terrorist plots.Similarly, difficulties in detecting attempted homegrown attacks are also present in the fact that homegrown terror plots tend to involve significantly fewer actors and connections to terrorist networks at home and abroad.The frequency of lone wolf actors, radicalized independent of direct connections to terrorist networks either through the Internet or social circles, can further elevate these challenges.In 2007, The Heritage Foundation became the first and only organization to track thwarted terrorist attacks against the United States.That year, Heritage reported that at least 19 publicly known terrorist attacks against the United States had been foiled since 9/11. The fact that the United States has not suffered a large-scale attack since 9/11 speaks to the country’s counterterrorism successes.The group had also acquired surveillance and night vision equipment and wireless video cameras.[27] Two more men were later indicted in the plot: Ali al-Timimi, the group’s spiritual leader, and Ali Asad Chandia.

Ali al-Timimi was found guilty of soliciting individuals to assault the United States and was sentenced to life in prison.

Instead, many of these plots could be categorized as homegrown terror plots—planned by American citizens, legal permanent residents, or visitors radicalized predominately in the United States.[1] Combating this continued threat of homegrown terrorism requires not only continued reliance on existing counterterrorism and intelligence tools, such as the PATRIOT Act, but also enhancing cooperation among federal, state, and local authorities as well as mutual trust and partnerships with Muslim communities throughout the United States.

Likewise, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and Congress must continue to plug gaps to halt terrorist travel, and create a lawful detainment framework for the incapacitation and interrogation of suspected terrorists.

Since 9/11, terrorist networks have been dismantled, training camps have been dispersed, and the terrorist leadership largely decimated.

Internationally, al-Qaeda has become more decentralized, leading to a greater dependence on its affiliates and allies.

Khan is said to have been in contact with 9/11 mastermind Khalid Sheik Mohammed and planned to bomb underground storage tanks at Maryland gas stations.[20] Uzair was convicted and sentenced to 30 years in prison.